Stalking & Psychopathy: Pernicious Attachments

A predator in our community evokes fear and an anxious curiosity to learn more about our vulnerability and the seemingly incomprehensible acts of a ‘monster’.

Stalking & Psychopathy: Pernicious Attachments2020-05-28T14:36:29+00:00

Project Description

People identified as a Stalker or Psychopath often share the relentless and rapacious label of predator however tend to have vastly different clinical profiles and attachment patterns.

Stalking is commonly referred to as the persistent and unwanted contact, communication and/or surveillance of an individual by another person or group. As laws and organizational policies expand, stalking has been progressively referred to as criminal harassment. Stalking behaviours can occur in person, online, among teens and adults, by strangers, co-workers and former partners. Utilizing case examples, stalking based forensic victimology and the biopsychosocial traits commonly associated with Stalking and Stalking Psychopaths, we will take an empirically guided examination of this pernicious behaviour through the developmental and relational lens of attachment theory.

The length of time and purpose of the presentation (general education or special interest workshop) will determine the breath and depth of this topic. The aforementioned presentation can be modified for general education and a broad audience. A general audience will receive general knowledge of pernicious attachments (developmental, maladaptive / adaptive functioning and attachment), identifying behaviours and patterns of stalkers and psychopaths and restorative / protective approaches to safety.

Stalking: Pernicious Attachments. Session One

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants of this presentation will be able to identify salient developmental and attachment patterns of people who engage in stalking behaviour (not including psychopaths).
  2. Utilizing the biopsychosocial traits commonly associated with stalking, identify and analyze the impact of early attachment trauma and adaptive and maladaptive functioning. 
  3. Utilizing a Stalker case example with forensic victimology, demonstrate the attachment patterns, decision-making process and function of Targeted Victim(s). 
  4. Critically evaluate approaches for engagement, interviewing and management of Stalkers. 

Psychopaths Who Stalk: Pernicious Attachments. Session Two

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants of this presentation will be able to differentiate between the developmental and attachment patterns of psychopathic stalkers and non-psychopathic stalkers. 
  2.  Utilizing the biopsychosocial traits commonly associated with psychopaths, identify and analyze the impact of early attachment trauma and adaptive and maladaptive functioning.
  3. Utilizing a Psychopath Stalker case example with forensic victimology, demonstrate the attachment patterns, decision-making process and function of Targeted Victim(s).
  4. Critically evaluate approaches for engagement, interviewing and management of a Psychopath Stalker.
See our Events Calendar for upcoming presentations or Contact Us to schedule a presentation for your organization.